HOSPITALITY MINISTRY

Plan Your Visit – Please reach out to our Church to plan your visit. We will have a member greet you, sit by you, and invite you to a meal fellowship after Church: info.faithbibleaz@gmail.com

Why does Faith Bible Church aim to be hospitable to you as you Plan Your Visit?

Hospitality is wonderful way for Christians to responsibly display love in the Church (1 Tim 3:2; 1 Pet 4:9). Hospitality comes from the Greek word Philoxenon: ‘Philos’ (friendly, brotherly love) + ’xenon’ (stranger). Therefore, it means to be friendly and show brotherly love to strangers and guests. The English word ‘philanthropy’ comes from the same root ‘philos’, from which we get ‘philadelphia’, and the greek concept of brotherly love, and affection. Therefore, we see the idea of being friendly to Christian strangers who could be visiting from out of town, missionaries, or Christians looking for a new Church home. The Theological Lexicon of the NT says of 1 Tim 3:2,

“Christ mentioned hospitality as a distinguishing characteristic of his true disciples (Matt. 25:35), and in the primitive church it was the most obvious and most common work of love, shown either to journeying brethren (cf. Jas 4:13) or especially to preachers of the gospel (3 John 5-8)… In the Christian church, it was the bishop, acting as host on behalf of the local community, who was philoxenos and offered a bed and shelter to traveling brothers (1 Tim 3:2; Titus 1:8). But for all Christians, hospitality was to be the first evidence of their philadelphia, according to Heb 13:2—“Do not neglect hospitality (tēs philoxenias mē epilanthanesthe), for through hospitality some have without knowing it entertained angels.”[1]

As Christians, we do not want to neglect or complain about the opportunity to offer our homes, food, and time to those who are strangers, but brothers in Christ (1 Pet. 4:9). Therefore, if you are a Christian, but a stranger to Fatih Bible Church we want to hear from you before we visit.

[1] Spicq, C., & Ernest, J. D. (1994). Theological lexicon of the New Testament (Vol. 3, p. 454). Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers.